Halloween night is supposed to be spooky but fun. However, it can get genuinely terrifying for New Jersey drivers and pedestrians.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Halloween is crawling with drunk drivers, with the scariest hours falling between 6 p.m. on Oct. 31 and 6 a.m. on Nov. 1. Between 2012 and 2016, 44 percent of all traffic fatalities during those hours happened as the result of an alcohol-related crash. Further, younger people are disproportionately impacted. In 2016, almost half of all people who died in drunk driving crashes on Halloween were between the ages of 21 and 34. Fortunately, no pedestrians were killed on Halloween night in 2016.

In order to reduce the risk of drunk driving accidents, AAA encourages Halloween partygoers to designate a sober driver, call a ride-sharing service or use public transportation if they plan to consume alcohol. People should also look out for each other and make sure inebriated friends don’t get behind the wheel. Meanwhile, drivers should travel slowly and watch out for trick-or-treaters. Parents can help keep their children safe by ensuring that costumes don’t obstruct a child’s vision and adding reflective tape to clothing to enhance visibility. Kids should also be given flashlights and instructed to walk against the flow of traffic.

Halloween car accidents can be caused by a number of factors, including drunk, distracted and reckless driving. Individuals who are injured in a car crash caused by another party may need to file a lawsuit to recover their losses. A personal injury attorney could review the case and help gather evidence supporting the claim. Once the lawsuit is filed, it could lead to a settlement that covers medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering.

Source: CT Post, “AAA warns against Halloween safety risks“, Amanda Cuda, Oct. 25, 2018